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Reflex for trick question


Horton
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So I am relearning to trick after 20 years. I am loving the Radar trick ski and using a Reflex binding. My question is:

 

It seems like the binding is too free front to back. I feel like I would feel better if there was a forward stop. Does everyone use the normal Reflex boot for tricks? Am I missing something?

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"too free front to back". While I'm pretty sure you (@Horton) are not talking about the boot loose in the Reflex/Silveretta release mechanism, this may be a problem if you just pulled an old Reflex out of the closet and slapped it on the ski. The horseshoe can loosen up or the plate can warp changing the boot's fit in the release mechanism. Use large fender washers under the horseshoe and check the security of all the Reflex plate screws frequently. There are other horseshoe setups (FM is very nice) that address the problem better but if you have a fender washer, check the spacing of the Silveretta clip and keep the screws tight, the boot will not slop around in the release setup. I mention this because it is a very common issue I see and one of the easiest ways to improve the feel of the Reflex setup.

 

If the feel in the shell is "too free front to back" there are a few things you can do. First (as @bracemaker and @ShaneH mentioned before) get an Intuition style liner. You may need a larger shell as the Intuition is physically larger. Heat molding the liner may allow the Intuition to work in the smaller shell - what is important to realize is that liners are an integral part of the setup and it may be non-trivial to switch liners. But I recommend an Intuition wrap around style liner despite the effort needed. The right liner really makes a difference!

 

Most hardshell cuffs allow a lot of movement. And the normal setting stands you up too straight (too much on your heel). I pin my cuffs (not quite like @Krlee) but I pin them in a forward cant. Remove the liner, push the cuff forward and drill a large hole (~3/8) through both the cuff and the base plastic in the back of the shell. I use window washer rubber hose with a #6 bolt and fender washers as my pin. Use enough rubber that it squishes a fair amount. The rubber prevents the pin from tearing the plastic of the shell while stiffening the boot and canting it at a more trick skiing favorable angle.

 

Stiffening tongues can be of some benefit (as @Deanoski notes). I have used Rollerblade plastic for a small stiffening and snow boot ski plastic tongues for a lot of stiffening.

 

The FM shell is a bit stiffer, has a bit more volume for a comfortable fit with the Intuition liner, holds up well and is widely used. New Reflexes have a lot of options and can be set up for tricks quite well - but it will be a bit different feel than a slalom setup.

 

I know a few people who duct tape all the movement out of their ankles before putting their feet into a stock setup. Whatever works!

 

Eric

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The other issue I am having is keeping the boot on the ski when I do flips. I have already moved the release closer to the toe hoop and set the spring to 11. Any smart trickers out there?
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When doing toes, use the standard Reflex setup. Sometimes a release is helpful with toes.

 

I hate releases on hands. I'm more likely to get injured from the ski flailing around than by a pull or twist from the ski still on. The standard solution is to add snowboard style clips over the Reflex setup. Attach the snowboard straps to the plate so the strap goes over the middle of the boot pulling a bit backward (just like a snowboard binding).This holds the boot in place (up to the strength limit of the clips or plate). It's easy to unclip for toes or clip in for hands. Doesn't add too much weight either.

 

@Horton I'll bring some to Adobe this weekend.

 

Eric

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@eleeski I don't trick so bear with me. So it sounds like you go with no-release on hands, but release on toes? Are the falls that much different that you're not worried about a 1 foot in fall on hands but are on toes? Or do you also run a heel strap on hands to keep your back foot in? Or is it a just in case type of thing, since the release from the ski might mitigate the release from the pylon being slow?
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@buski Toes load you differently and concentrate the load on one leg. Also until you are doing lots of toe steps, normal loads do not overload the release mechanism. Hands are most commonly two footed and, especially with flips, load the release a lot. Front foot out, back foot in are very dangerous. The flailing ski has left several scars on my legs.

 

Personally, I use a release for all my tricks that is designed more to protect my ski and binding than my body. I'm stronger than my hardware. My release system works well for me (it's not a Reflex despite my recommendation of the product). I've been fortunate to avoid too many injuries from tricking in a rather long skiing career. (Slalom is a different story - 6 more weeks of crutches...)

 

@Horton You'll need a small 90* bracket to attach the straps to the plate. Attach the bracket in the back third of the plate. Or use strapping th attach to the plate. I've seen both but personally haven't mounted either.

 

Eric

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