Jump to content

Hip Rotation and strength Video from the PT clinic


cragginshred
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Baller

Marcus' video got me shuffling through my clinical 'toolbox'. Ideas began flowing from the info he presented regarding the rear hip internally rotating with the offside pull to allow a true 'open' position. He put forth an interesting premise: when hip range of motion is limited we twist our spine to be 'open' to compensate. This video was created to 'springboard' off his ideas and provide you some exercises to increase your hip range of motion and strengthen the powerful hip rotators. Here is the result;

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIk2Ny77bJ0&feature=youtu.be

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller
Great video on top of the instruction from Marcus. Totally agree with the flexibility as soon as I watched Marcus discussing twisting your spine and loading it I understood why as I have advanced this year especially at the end of the season my lower back was killing me even though my form was better. Since I have been dry land practicing I can really tell that I have no hip flexibility on my offside. Are there any simple stretches to start with to get everything loosened up.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller
Glad to see this. Our lumbar spines have a maximum rotation per vertebral segment of 3 degrees. This means that herniation can occur past this point. By contrast, we have 7 degrees per segment in our thoracic spine. Train low back for stability not mobility and train to get the mobility from hips and thoracic. Also the peak load is right off the buoy at the precise time that we are twisted ranging from 600lb of load and up. Can be a bad combination.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller

@Waternut lack of hip mobility will cause you to twist at other joints. Slow the motion down with less range and work hip not ankle. The knee twisting is the femur rotating on the tibia and will wreak havoc on your meniscus.

The purpose in the video is to increase and strengthen the hip rotators Not re enforce already existing compensations that occur due to lack of mobility . The section later where I add T-spine rotation laterally and rotationally with hip flexor and hamstring stretching is supper important too. Poor t spine mobility leads to compensations in the Lumbar spine and many injuries. Take it slow, watch for compensations and build on 'what you got' as Marcus said.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller

@34mph great question. Prorioceptors in your joints and musculature key into; slants, vectors, planes of motion, velocity, pressure ect. They also assist with muscle recruitment or how many fibers are activated (picking up an envelope not many are activated, but running the course they are on alert status).

So, using a firm piece of foam as in the video causes an increase in arousal of the proprioceptors and musculature. We use the term 'dormant butt' to describe lazy gluts. Put this person in a single leg stance, then add the foam as able and a dormant butt becomes a well trained butt or gluteus maximus.

Neuro musculature re education is the term we use when rehabbing dormant joint and surrounding musculature. It involves the feedback of the proprioceptors to the central nervous system and then the CNS' adjustments and allows for correction and more efficient motor execution.

Hopefully that makes sense gives you something to chew on for a while! You might be able to tell this stuff gets me excited!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller

I understand that I'm just asking if you think you are getting increase IR mm activation with balance bad, ie is that your goal or is it try to get everything working at one time

(erectors , TVA, Abds) ? Just picking your brain , I guess I have a little different thought process. When you put some one on a unstable surface unless they are a dancer they have to worry more about balancing then the movement at hand. So I guess What I'm asking are you trying to get the IR's activated / stronger or work on something else?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller
I think you would get more out of the Hip IR if you could get rid of the balance board and just use the Hip. Using the balance board for the average per will involve to much on ankle stability , and core then your hip. I think the HIP IR strengthen along with glut activation is the most important aspects of a stack position.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller

Think progression. Range of motion first with out the foam that would give you more motion but less strengthening. The goal is both range first then core activation via decelerating hip IR with ER's. The average person would start without the foam If you want maximum core activation you add the foam due to the above stated reasons. The adaptation is in relation to the demand, little demand, little adaptation, greater demand, greater adaptation.

Ankle stability and skiing is kind of big deal and the relationship between the hip and the ankle is enormous, my next video!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...