Jump to content

Ski Size means what????


Horton
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Administrators

I have explained this a few times in the last week so I guess it is time to post it.

 

When the R&D team at any factory develops a ski there is usually one size ski to start with. As they develop a new ski they work on that one size but the “size” is whatever works best for the test skiers. As they chop and glue and grind and bondo the ski changes. It may get bigger or smaller or wider or narrower or longer or shorter. When they get done the final ski might be an inch longer or shorter than then where they started.

 

At this point they have to decide what the weight range / speed range the ski will be for. For most test teams it will roughly fit a 36 mph skier who weighs about 170 lbs (call it a 66”). If the new ski is physically longer or shorter than expected they may simply chop or add from the tip of the ski to make it a 66".

 

Here is the point. If the final ski behaves like a ski that the skiing public expects from a 66” ski the factory will simply add or subtract from the tip to make it roughly 66”. Some factories simply call the new ski a size but don’t always tweak the length to match.

 

Once the mother ski is designed the R&D team up and down size the shape for the other sizes. They may also teak the shape for the other sizes as needed.

 

Personally I ski on 67s. All the factories know what that means. If the ski is actually 67 inches long is totally irrelevant.

 

Of course to make this less clear there are always exceptions. The sizing at Goode has always been a bit different but became more standard a year or two ago. The sizing at Denali is not exactly the same as expected and I think that might be a work in progress.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller
It gets complicated quick these days. Surface area and lift seem to be more in focus now than just length. At 190-200lbs, I used to ski on much longer skis than almost everyone (68-69 inches). The logic I got from pros was, if you can turn it, then it isn't too big. I have now skied on a 65.5 inch Goode, and a 66 and 66.5 inch Denali, and none of them felt small to me at all. Part of the rationale I've heard is surface area and lift. I'm not smart enough to figure all that out, but at my current weight of 195 the 66.5 inch Denali feels great!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller

I totally agree with Horton's comments. I did find that the Nano 1 for example felt small to me as a 66.5" ski where the 66" Goode Mid felt fine to me. Both of those skis were the recommended size for me (6' 220). I am on a 68" Vapor now (2015) and feel plenty of support but I haven't really pushed the ski yet.

 

I do agree it is best to reference what the manufacturer recommends for you and start there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...