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SKI PERFORMANCE


MuskokaKy
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Hey Ballers,

 

I found myself re watching episodes of FlowPointTV last night. I was watching the one with Will Asher and he got me thinking about the construction of the ski. I have never played with shaping a ski or anything along those lines before. What it really got me thinking about was the Radar line of skis, specifically the Senate and Vapor and the what performance changes are gained from the different core structures.

 

For example Senate has 3 "classes" Alloy, Graphite and Lithium and the Vapor has Graphite, Lithium and Pro Build. I understand the cores are different but how does that actually relate to performance? What are you gaining with the upgrade in the core in relation to performance? is it durability / My understanding is the shape of the ski does no change based on the core make up. I actually own both skis one senate alloy from 2016 and 2017 lith vap. I use the senate for free ski and to start my year off and use the vap for course ( mainly). I assume its more noticeable for the pro's / high end skiers but I am truly curious. #RadaR @brooks @eddie_roberts_jr

 

Thanks,

 

Ky

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@MuskokaKy You are correct in the way we make skis. Anything with the Vapor name comes out of the same mold and has the same shape, the only difference is the core materials on the inside, Same is true with the Senate. All Radar Skis use 100% Carbon fiber meaning no fiberglass which makes them lighter and more reactive. The difference is the core itself and the stiffness. Our ProBuild utilizes a PMI foam which is the lightest and most responsive foam on the market. Lithium Construction uses a PVC Core, Graphite uses a Polyurethane Core and Alloy a Hybrid of Polyurethane and wood stringers. The biggest difference you'll feel as a consumer is responsiveness. The PMI will be the most responsive meaning that as your ski is turning and flexing you're losing energy, PMI will allow the ski to return back to its normal shape fastest and allow you to build cross course speed from the widest point. PVC will be a touch slower in response and so on and so forth as you move down. This is a very tangible feeling as a skier from a pro level all the way to an amateur. If you were to ride all 4 constructions back to back you would feel that energy through the turn change with each core material. Essentially you're gaining better turns and more speed as you go up in core materials. Hope that helps explain it Ky, let me know if you have any more questions!

 

Brooks

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