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Data from the groundwater sustainability plan indicates the lakes have minimal impact.


Horton
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From the "Newberry Springs Recreational Lakes Association

 

This article is being written to dispel the notion that the Newberry Springs Lakes waste water.

 

It is well documented by the Mojave Water Agency, and by well reports, that all the lakes in the region as a whole use only 6.8% of the total water pumped in the basin. This 6.8% also includes many of the lakes homeowner's domestic water use.

 

Compared to agriculture that pumps 75% of the basin's water, the lakes are not even close to pumping the same volume as agriculture. In fact, the lakes recirculate most of the water that they pump back into the aquifers. Thus, the only minor water loss is evaporation.

 

Most folks agree that this is a relatively small amount of water usage as compared to the agriculture water producers in the area, and the lakes and the homeowners have contributed to the Newberry Springs area for over 40 years through recreational, social, economic and wildlife benefits.

 

Read the rest of the article here

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That is interesting. It looks like a water allocation dispute is brewing that could have a devastating impact on a major water ski community. What is the science behind the statement, particularly the absorption vs evaporation comment? I have only skied on one lake in Newberry Springs (one of the prettiest ski sites I have ever seen), and it has a rubber "liner" to prevent water loss. I would think that the majority of the water "lost" from this lake would be from evaporation. Evaporation isn't surprising given the desert's heat, sunshine and low humidity.

 

On a related topic, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) are by regulation broadening the definition of the waters subject to their regulatory control under the Clean Water Act. Over the years, they have expanded and expanded the scope of their review of projects involving water use and or having an impact on water resources. A federal court decision a few years ago reined them in. Rather than pursuing an appeal of the decision, they are "fixing" the "problem" by redefining what are "navigable waters of the United States." If adopted, this will likely have a significant impact on the use and development of land, and in particular, building ski lakes. Some commentators have argued that under the proposed regs, a roadside drainage ditch could be navigable waters.

 

While this is also a matter of politics and thus potentially out of bounds here, this rule change, if adopted and not otherwise blocked by Congress or the courts, could be a real pain in the butt for us. For example, if a ski lake meets the revised definition of "navigable waters of the United States," the use of weed killing chemicals, the application of lawn fertilizer, or even the installation of a septic system or the construction of a home in your ski lake development could, under the Clean Water Act, be subject to ACOE permit jurisdiction.

Lpskier

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@lpskier‌ I promise you there is no effective rubber or plastic liner on any lake in Newberry. There are pieces of plastic sheet on the bottom of Cheyenne. It is FAR from a water seal. I guess they put it down for weed control - not sure - it was a long time ago
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This is an interesting topic and one I've wondered about recently with the ongoing drought in the west. With the ongoing water shortages in CA I've been surprised to not hear more about regulation of water pumping for artificial lakes. Hopefully articles like this along with intervention by USAWaterski will help preserve water sources for all of our ski ponds.
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I'm holding an article for a few days that will go on the front page how about this subject.

 

I'm not sure how much of this article is repeated in the first post of this thread but it does offer some clarification

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