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What do you guys want?


brooks
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  • Baller

I'm always interested in anything about gates -- such a hard thing to get right and so frustrating b/c you often can't get anywhere on your hardest pass with a sub-par gate.

 

The other general thing that interests me a lot is what I recently dubbed "managing the geometry." At extremely short line lengths, there's this weird additional dimension beyond the form basics like stacked position. We've been having a lot of discussion here on BOS about how pulling harder can sometimes be bad, and things like "hand control," "fluid movements," "constantly moving," "smooth reach" can be the key to being able to make extremely short lines work.

 

But details help! What exactly should one be doing -- and when -- to manage that short-line geometry?

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  • Baller

Btw, I discovered on a different thread that some people are very focused on edge change as a fundamental technique in their skiing, and others (including me) don't ever "intentionally" change edges. The change of edges happens, of course, but for me (and about half the others on that thread) it's the result of focusing on other things.

 

I actually hadn't previously realized this dichotomy in how people think about their movements in the course.

 

Anyhow, for me personally I doubt I would get a lot of mileage out of a discussion that focuses on edge change. Whereas for others it sounds like it might the key to their whole way of attacking the course!

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  • Baller

And finally, a general request: In any article about what to do in skiing, I feel it's critical to also include the following:

 

How do I know if I am doing it? What good things should I feel?

 

How do I know if I am NOT doing it? What are the tell-tale symptoms? Even better, how can I indentify on an easier pass if I'm "getting away with it" as opposed to actually doing it right?

 

And most of all: Thanks for taking the time to ask and to try to help us!!!

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  • Baller

I think anything on skiing would be great. Gates, edge change, maintaining speed, staying in the "game" when you make a mistake, slalom misconceptions etc.

 

The key I think, is to not be so general. I think alot of waterski articles are too general and dont give any specifics on how to accomplish the tasks. Thats why Bruce's article on handle control is done so well. He explains what the movements are, how it helps and gives you many ways to think about it and execute it. The pictures also show exactly what the text is talking about. Bruce's article expalins exactly what needs to be done for proper handle control. It also describes what not to do as well.

 

"The Perfect Release" in wsm was a good article aswell, maybe a little short but too the point. Where I am now thinking I could probably benefit from a little longer back arm pressure to get me wider

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I've been meaning to ask you about pelvis and shoulder direction and rotation off the second wake. There are skiers to seem change edges without moving much above the waist.

 

I've also been meaning to talk you about something I see Karina, Will, Taylor Moseley and a few other skiers do. On approach to the buoy their torso is relatively vertical and the handle is low and forward. Can you shed some light?

DSC_7448.JPG
From Diable Day 3 Open Womens (Mostly)

 

 

 

Third and final for today, I'm curious what you think about excessive counter rotation of the ball. How much is the right amount?

 

 Goode  KD Skis ★ MasterCraft ★ PerfSki ★ Radar ★ Reflex ★ S Lines ★ Stokes

Drop a dime in the can

 

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I live in the midwest, where we start off skiing in 50-55 degree water, it moves close to 90 in the summer, then back to 50 - 55 before we give it up in the Fall. I'm not one that likes to tweak fin every other day (or even every week). Would prefer to limit it to 3 settings during the season---one at, say, 60 degree water temp, one at 75 degree, and one at 85+ degree. Let's assume that 75 degree is the "standard" setting. Would appreciate "general" feedback that will keep it simple (or make it simpler) for skiers like me.
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  • Baller
Sight lines at deep shortline. At 28 off I can reach max width well before the buoy and thus be returning wake bound off the back of the ball. Is this still possible at shortline ie) 38 or should my line forced more down course such that feeling of "later" is still ok?
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  • Baller_

I've been using outside the course drills for myself and teaching other skiers. To me developing technique without chasing bouys has been very affective for my skiing and I'v seen immediate positive changes in others. . I've described this drill several times on this forum not knowing there was actually video footage (thanks to another post on BOS) and a description by a top coach. What I'd like to see is updated versions of this and others in vid form. More drill ideas with video. This one is a great way to learn what stacked FEELS like vs trying to accomplish it in a split second 6 times. Gorden looks at it as getting and feeling more lean and ski on edge but look how stacked he is.

 

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  • Baller_

I've been using outside the course drills for myself and teaching other skiers. To me developing technique without chasing bouys has been very affective for my skiing and I'v seen immediate positive changes in others. . I've described this drill several times on this forum not knowing there was actually video footage (thanks to another post on BOS) and a description by a top coach. What I'd like to see is updated versions of this and others in vid form. More drill ideas with video. This one is a great way to learn what stacked FEELS like vs trying to accomplish it in a split second 6 times. Gorden looks at it as getting and feeling more lean and ski on edge but look how stacked he is.

 

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