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How forgiving is the 08 Monza?


Skoot1123
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So in reading the comments on the new Goode N1 I have to wonder how forgiving my ski is. (HO Monza '08) It seems to have a decent/ good amount of rocker on it thereby making the tip rise/wheelie if you come out of the turn wrong (or just grab the handle too quickly). When we say forgiving it would seem to apply mostly in the turns? Not sure I'd be able to describe forgiving ability behind the boat. Thanks in advance!
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@skoot I skied the Monza for 4 years and it is very forgiving. I brought it back out this year and skied it for a month while I was trying other skis. After coming off a 66 and 67 Strada, I tried the Fusion, A2, S2, Goode 9960 and Monza. The Nano 1 was the only ski that felt better then my Monza.
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@FrankS True BUT!!! The System 8 felt quite different than the Monza. I liked the Monza (a lot) and hated the System 8. Maybe it was the weight or stiffness difference but the feel was noticeable to me. Subjective data from one of the ski tests of years past. Upgrade to a Monza.

 

The Monza is a great value in an older ski. There are lots of them around at reasonable prices. A brand new ski is better but your skiing can progress quite well on a Monza. After a while the Monza will advance you until you absolutely need the new ski!

 

Eric

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Italian record men 35+ was set and then reset this past yr by the same guy on the same ski...Monza. into 41 off. He tested an HO-CoX while skiing with me in FL. Liked it. Bought it and ran 5 at 39 a few sets in. Monza is now a shelf.
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@Horton (or whomever wants to take a stab at it) there is an underlying suggestion here (and on other threads) that we've had a real revolution (or fast-evolution?) in ski design between - let's say -2008/09-2011/12... how would you characterize it? What are the design elements that are so different?

 

@Wish, between @Horton's review and that anecdote which you shared earlier in the summer, as well as a few other comments here-and-there, I think I've settled on a CoX SL for my new stick this fall.

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There are really two things going on in the last 10+ years. I am sure I am going to screw up some of the chronology but the Ballers will fill in the blanks.

 

First there was the carbon fiber & light core revolution that was started by Goode. The 9100 was the first noteworthy light all carbon ski on the market. In the mid 90s O’Brien made the Sixam that was the first non-Goode ski that was remarkably light and fast. Soon after that HO made the Monza and since then pretty much all high end skis have been all carbon with light cores.

 

Second is the evolution of ski shape. With year round development by a handful of skiers, shapes are simply getting better every year. Currently we are seeing designers looking a lot at ski widths and torsional flex.

 

Not all of current skis are fast (depending on how you define fast). Assuming that materials are all the same, speed is more about the shape of the ski than anything else. More speed is not always better.

 

Speaking very generally a faster ski is less forgiving and a slower ski is more dependable. Perhaps the fastest ski I have ever personally ever ridden is the hardest ski to ski on. A big part of speed is how deep the ski rides in the water. If I ski rides really high it will generally be finicky in the turn.

 

There are a few all carbon skis that I think of as being pretty slow that are also all time classics. The D3 X5 and the HO A1. The trick that I think some designers are working on is how to make a ski fast across the lake but ride deeper (slower) at the ball.

 

 Goode  KD Skis ★ MasterCraft ★ PerfSki ★ Radar ★ Reflex ★ S Lines ★ Stokes

Drop a dime in the can

 

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I think that there is something to be said for style in this. I have skied on my RS-1 for two seasons. As fast as anything I have ridden (includes GOODE) and feels 100% natural around the buoy. I have never skied anything this stable and fast, and my scores have gone way up because of that. I feel the same way about the Strada. Very fast, very stable. I run my bindings all the way forward (according to Radar's insert pattern with radar universal plate) and it is still extremly fast. I fear for my skiing if Radar ever goes under.
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@eleeski what do you like in the monza that you didnt see in the system 8? I am actually looking to maby purchase a new ski because the system 8 is actually my dads. I am in high school and still live at home so that isnt a big deal and I am in no rush to get a new ski, but it would be nice to have my own ski. How much would a monza cost me? Would it be worth buying one or could i get a more modern ski for a similar price? I am still skiing at -15 but am hoping to considerably improve these coming summers so would the monza be "too much ski" for me?

thanks,

Frank

 

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@Franks Buoy count was the main difference. The System 8 felt sluggish and unresponsive and kept me from being where I wanted to be. The Monza was a comfortable ski. Subjective differences that translated to real performance variations. The Monza will take your skiing to a higher level. So will many of the new skis.

Eric

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