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The new Flextail


bbruzzese
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I think they are still delivering them, no? But anyhow the only report I've heard "from the field" so far was overwhelming positive. But he's a regular here, so I'll let him speak for himself when he gets the chance.
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I completely agree with @OB! Truly amazing at this point. I've had the ski for exactly one week and I'm already at my practice scores and much more often and much, much more consistent 35's and it's only getting better!
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Sorry guys, I can say he same thing about my new V-Type. Nothing special about what Goode is doing... The V-Type is a keeper without even trying the Goode.

Mike's Overall Binding

USA Water Ski  Senior Judge   Senior Driver   Senior Tech Controller

 

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Sooner or later one of these new high end ski's is going to be remembered as a game changer, either way its great to see them pushing the boundaries and going outside of the box. In the end its us as skiers that benefit.
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Hey guys just wanted to say I'm super pumped about the new #flextail aka gator tail which we call here down in Florida lol just wanted to say I couldn't be any more excited not just about my skiing / results but to hear all of you guys so excited about your own skiing !! That's what's it all about right ? There's just a couple things I wanted to talk about or even help answer. I'm been getting a tremendous amount of phone calls for fin settings , people giving me positive feedback or a little help getting fin and binders on the sweet spot. * but one thing here that I want to help answer is people are asking me will the ski work for me at slower speeds or at longer rope length ?? ABSOLUETLY here's what I felt right away getting off my old ski to the new flextail. Right away I had a tremendous amount of created space from bouy to bouy. Chad and I couldn't believe it when we were testing it in Covington. The second thing is the efficiency out of the turn with less pressure through ski / through body and the end result is better swing into next ball , staying with the boat. I TRULY believe one of the key things that everybody is feeling esp with today's speed control , stronger boats , better boats but stronger boats is that the tail is def moving away and sheering water in a different way that we've never felt before , and I think you guys are feeling that by not feeling the forces as much out of the turn and getting tremendous angle before the boat is picking you up. I can see where the Flextail is really helping the 34mph guys that slay buoys all day long
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@MS you do realize that every factory that makes a really good high end ski is in a constant state of R&D.

 

Wait nevermind I just realized who I was debating with. Love you man

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@CParrish43 hey CP welcome to the forum. Its about time you joined the Ballers.

The way I've interpreted what I've heard so far is that if the skier is calm at apex the finish of the turn is unbelievably flowy and smooth.

Would you say the FishBone (FlexTail) needs a skier who is very calm and precise at apex?

Does it forgive somebody who does some sort of drunken rodeo maneuver at the end of turn like me?

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@horton great question. Yes and here's why.. If you're more efficient and say you're coming out of your onside and make a mistake into your offside , because where you are in relationship with the boat I would say yes you can and the ski will still keep going because the boat isn't getting away from you. Hope that helps brother
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@CParrish43 considering that I only have use of one arm for the next 6 months I need a lot of help. I don't think a new ski will make it easier to put on socks with one hand.

 

And don't even talk to me about trying to change a diaper with one arm.

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I rode one at Greg Badal's Tuesday. It was only one ride and I think I would have preferred the bigger ski but I liked it immediately. Creates space,moves out easy and turns like nothing I have ever ridden.

@CParrish34 send Hortons ski to me. I'll ride it until he heals.

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@Dirt when I got hurt I gave Dave Goode clear instructions that if somebody from Sacramento called claiming to be me and asking for the test ski he was report on the phone number Sacramento PD as a scam
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I got mine on Wednesday last week. Skied it 4 sets, and almost matched my Tournament PB at Warman Record Tournament this past Saturday with my 6th set on the ski. 4@38 and I was early and wide for 4 ball....... My best prior to that was a 4 1/2 and a 5 from last season. But I was no where near in as good of shape thru 4 as last Saturday! I was really in the pass and capable of making that new PB!

 

My comment is it creates way more space before the ball than I have ever felt. At 38, I tend to stop the ski coming out of the turn, and this flex tail keeps carrying the speed thru the turn. I feel it in less fatigue and less water blinding my vision at 38! No stall. The shorter the line the more it seems to like it.

 

This ski is a keeper and I believe I will run a tournament 38 on it!

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@6balls great question . Try this and It will 100% def help , it looks like your super early and not sure what to do with it. 2 parts here , first leaving the wakes make sure you keep taking everything out , esp with this ski cause you're creating more space , but if you are over-turning over loading you're probably rushing to the handle to quick with your freehand , be patient let it finish. Hope that helps , if that doesn't , might need a slight fin adjustment
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Ok playing devils advocate... The tail flexes. And if I am understanding, not only side to side (shark tail) but up and down (dolphin tail for visual sake). What will be the integrally of this area of the ski long term (it is not arguable that that has been a past issue with new goodes)? Has that been tested? Can that even be tested?. I would think this is one of if not the highest pressure points a ski goes through under the force of the water vs skier. That's a lot of force and flexing in an area that has now been sliced to flex in a never before seen direction. I get that there is part of the fin box used as a spine of sorts but is that enough long term. $2k every couple years is a bit costly if they lose integrity faster then other skis. But make no mistake...would I want one..? Based on what I have read..hell ya!! But the question is on the table. Is tail integrity gonna be a long term issue and if not...why?
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From what I understand slight flex side to side, more of a standard flex up and down, engineering a spine that flexes and maintains its structural integrity is not new, but now it is to a slalom ski. The torque box on Mapple skis is new and very innovative, as well as D3 adjustable rocker tail, which are also a change from "standard" engineering, we all want these ski developers to push it so we can have the best and we keep laying down a couple grand every year or two because we want the latest best thing, that's ok.

 

I'm sure they are testing in the shop with presses and other instruments but also there have been several powerful skiers crushing it at rather short line, CP how many have you broke?

 

 

 

 

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@Wish Goode Skis aren't durable. They are high performance. F1 race car vs. Honda Accord. I think Goode stands pretty strongly behind being far more concerned about the performance than the longevity of the product. Does that lessen the products value? That's where we have to make up our minds. I'm with you 100%, that those of us out here paying for our skis can't really justify dropping 2 grand. Dave Goode needs us to, just to pay for the R&D, but if we aren't winning tournaments, with something more than a ribbon on the table, that's a chunk of change that hurts to part with.

And guys, I said it, that it doesn't lessen the value of the ski, so don't get all butt hurt that i said Goode's aren't durable. They aren't designed for durability? that sound better?

Still a good question though

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All good philosophical thought but does not answer the nuts and bolts of the question. By design, will the Flex tail break down faster then other ski brands or past Goodes. And "...I don't care" or "..why should you care" is not an answer.
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@MS i really don't mean they won't last. Like i said, they are built for performance. That said, I still had an old 9800sl that I would pull out and ride until a little more than a year ago. They will last, but I take the kid gloves when it comes to handling them, off the water especially.

All I'm really trying to say is it's up to the buyer as to what they are considering for "Value", all-out performance, or a mix of performance and durability.

@OB I'm on a Flextail, a T2, Rocker Block, even the Wilson Bros "Carve"? or was it "Swerve"? off the "Free Table" if it works, and this really seems to.

I'm excited by the level of design progression over the last year or 2.

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If you consider the likely failure as either Fatigue or Yielding. Both should be measurable and comparable to other ski. I would think Goode did some kind of failure analysis on the ski during development other than just skiing on it.

 

The spline along the top may help limit failure due to yield so If I had one of the skis I'd check the screws on the spline/fin box regularly. Also make sure the 6 cut slots are free of debris. A hard fall or hitting something could cause some damage. Any damage could accelerate failure due to fatigue so check it out after any event. Sooner or later all skis would breakdown or fail due to fatigue, just a question how many cycles and amplitude of loading.

 

Carbon fiber can be engineered to make some pretty tough stuff, its being use for turbine blades on Jet engines. You definitely wouldn't want a failure there.

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@Wish -i get the impression that the ' spine ' is internal as well as external and is not a part of the fin block.

 

@OB -*dying* on the water would probably be fine for any of us -but you wont like is as much if you survive but are paralyzed from eyebrows down.

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Since we're in wild speculation mode (my favorite!) I'll bring up the possibility that an internal spine is MORE durable that a traditional cast ski. I've gone through quite a few skis over the last few decades, but I'm still (just barely!) using my same old spine.

 

Something that is designed to flex has at least a possibility of being able to handle a lot more flex cycles before it begins to break down.

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