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ProStar: Teak vs Fiberglass Platform


bmurbs
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This is probably a duplicate but I couldn't find anything using search.... Looking for input/thoughts on which is better and why--teak or fiberglass platform on the new ProStar. Thanks in advance ballers.
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Not had a glass platform on the new ProStar, but have had them on others. I’m personally glad to be back on the teak platform on my ProStar. The only con I can think of it’s heavier and so harder to handle when folding. I don’t consider the teak maintenance a disadvantage.
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I have and like a fiberglass platform. I have found teak to be slippery. Mastercraft designs the platform well with sides that curve with the surface material... therefore when you hop into the water you don't grind your ski on a fiberglass edge.
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Teak. My brother has fiberglass and I have teak. I paid 630 bucks to have his repaired after backing into it lightly. A quarter size ding. With 50 bucks and 2 hours mine looks brand new. My looks better for one day after a new coat of oil, but his consistently looks better. I just don’t see how you won’t scratch a fiberglass one.
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Teak. Looks like it belongs and easy to keep up or fix. Has worked for 50 years without tearing up skis etc.

 

The fiberglass would be nice with the non slip surface and no maintenance. But, most I’ve seen have some chips or dings and the nonslip stuff eventually seems to pull up. Especially on rounded ends. Maybe MC has the non slip heat formed to want to stay curled down?

 

I’d say it depends on what your goal is. Lowest maintenance and you can deal with it potentially not looking perfect and don’t care for a “traditional” look, go fiberglass.

All else, go teak.

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Fiberglass. I prefer the lower maintenance and IMO, with today's modern boats the teak just looks out of place-dated. I think the Nautique 200 and get away with teak but not the other 3. But it's really personal preference they both work perfectly.

 

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Teak - the fiberglass shows scratches and looks beat up over time. I will admit as new the glass one looks great. There is some maintenance with teak but way cheaper than repairing a beat up glass one. I have a lot of kids and guests behind my boat in the summer. If it was just adult slalom skiers I might change my mind.
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@sodbuster88 @swc5150 when your friends are VERY excited to go skiing, they apparently forget to put the platform pins in (small garage, need to take platform off after each ski) - you know the rest of the story!

Kind of similar to forgetting to put in the plug I imagine

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I love teak platforms they look great even if you do not maintain them. Fiberglass scratches and chips and just look cheap after a summers use. Some are even very slippery. As fiberglass is harder material it can damage your ski.
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Huh. I totally ignored this thread before because I didn't think anyone was getting teak on a modern boat. I'm shocked by the teak love. In my experience synthetic dominantly wins on both safety (i.e. traction) and maintenance (zero vs. substantial), which are the only two things that matter to me. Teak looks nice ... right after you've sanded it and put 4 coats of teak oil on it.

 

When my previous boat (with teak) drove away with its new owner, I was more than happy to pass along that homework assignment to someone else.

 

Whereas, I've already spent more time typing this message than I've ever spent fussing with my synthetic platform, even though said platform is more than 10 years old.

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I oiled my teak platform 1 to 2 times a year and it always looked great. Especially when wet - which it usually was when I looked at it.

If the 1-2 hours a year it takes to maintain a teak platform is too much then so be it. In the time it takes for me to drain the oil during an oil change I could have my platform oiled.

 

I hate my fiberglass platform. It hurts on bare feet, scratches easily and gets crazy hot when dry.

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Bought a used boat with the grey teak platform. Sanded it down and oiled it so it looks brand new. It's not slippery at all. I think they only get slippery if you try sealing it with varnish or something. But just oiling it works great. Hardly takes any oil to keep it looking new. I wipe it thoroughly with a white rag after oiling to be sure there isn't any surface oil residue left that might get on clothing. This is what it looks like 5 years later with just adding a touch of stain every couple months to cover the scratches.

c3rcbkpoawfd.jpg

 

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